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Segreteria amministrativa soci SGI
alessandro.zuccari@socgeol.it

Segreteria amministrativa soci SIMP
segreteria@socminpet.it

 

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Elenco Sessioni proposte

P1. Responses and dynamics of ecosystems to environmental perturbations: from local to global, from short- to long-term

P2. Deciphering ancient paleoenvironmental perturbations and their impact on the marine ecosystems

P3. Timescales for measuring Earth Processes: from tectonic events to material ageing

P4. Biota evolution and Biomineralization

P5. Marine geohazards on the continental margins of Italy: the Magic Atlas

P6. The role of Italian scientists and educators in the International Ocean and Continental Drilling Programs: major achievements and new perspective

P7. Onshore and offshore Quaternary sedimentary processes and sequences in the Mediterranean regions

P8. The dynamics of sedimentary processes in coastal areas

P9. From analogue to digital geological mapping: opportunities and risks in the use of new tools

P10. Tectonic and sedimentation relationships in Mediterranean basins and belts. A tribute to Fabio Lentini

P11. Faulting and folding across the scales. How, where, and why the lithosphere deforms

P12. The role of shear zones in the tectono-metamorphic evolution of the lithosphere: insights from microfabric to mountain belt structures

P13. Tectono-metamorphic processes from micro-scale to plate margins: Geological, Geophysical and Petrological approaches in unravelling the evolution of metamorphic terrains in collisional belts

P14. Georesources and Energy for the XXI Century

P15. Outcrop analogues in exploration and production

P16. Integrated studies of recent and active deformations onland and offshore

P17. Tectonic and geodynamic control on large earthquakes and complex earthquake sequences: case studies from Italy and not only

P18. Tectonics and geodynamics of the central Mediterranean area: evidence from geophysics

P19. Mediterranean subduction zones: from deep mantle to shallow structure and volcanism

P20. Geodynamic evolution between the Variscan and Alpine orogeneses: clues from mantle features and magmatic events

P21. The nature of the crust-mantle transition and its effects on the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution

P22. Melt/fluid-rock interaction and migration from the mantle to the surface

P23. Magma genesis and transport

P24. Volatiles in magmas: solubility models and degassing processes. A tribute to Marcello Carapezza

P25. Computational thermodynamics of magmas, melting and vaporization processes

P26. Linking deep and surface processes: advances in volcanology from a multidisciplinary perspective

P27. Volcano Hazard Monitoring

P28. Minerals at non-ambient conditions: A Snapshot of the Earth and other planetary bodies

P29. Geomaterials: Nature, properties and technology

P30. Puzzle crystallography of inorganic structures. A tribute to Fiorenzo Mazzi

P31. Zeolites and porous materials: Unravelling the relations between crystal-chemistry, stability, structure and properties

P32. Environmental and medical mineralogy: from molecular to macro scale processes

P33. Mineralogy, waste management and environmental pollution

P34. Serpentinites: the environmental challenge

P35. Environmental pollution related to occurrences of asbestos and asbestiform minerals in geo-matrices

P36. Geosciences for Cultural Heritages

P37. Mining sites: from industrial heritage to cultural heritage

P38. Cave and karst studies: from ancient to modern processes

P39. Pre-Holocene Relative sea level changes

P40. Coastal hazards in a global sea level change scenario

P41. The contribute of the quantitative and qualitative hydrogeology in the study and management of the water resources

P42. Natural and anthropogenic extreme waters: criticalities and perspectives

P43. Monitoring of deformation of structures and ground surface displacements

P44. Fast-moving landslides: criteria and methodologies of hazard zonation and monitoring

P45. Landslides: processes, prediction and impact on society and cultural heritage

P46. Earth surface processes and related hazards: mapping, modeling and validation strategies

P47. The urban landscape: geomorphological historical evolution, geomorphosites and high risk scenarios

P48. Geoheritage and Landscape

P49. Geoparks and geosites: tools for knowledge and protection of geological heritage

P50. History of geosciences and Geoethics: the right way for social responsibility

P51. 1968-2018: Fifty years after the Belice's Earthquake. Considerations on geological, geophysical, geochemical, territorial and social aspects of this earthquake and its heritage in the connections between the Italian society and seismic catastrophes

P52. The role of abiotic and biotic soil components, environmental materials and factors, and physical evidence in criminal investigations, environmental crimes, and legal system

P53. Soil Science and the Sustainable Development Goals

P54. Planetary evolution: insights from geological studies, meteorite analyses and terrestrial analogues

P55. Geosciences at school 2018: geoscience and society

P56. Open Poster Session

 

P1. Responses and dynamics of ecosystems to environmental perturbations: from local to global, from short- to long-term

Proposers: Giulia Faucher (Univ. Milano), Massimo Bernardi (MUSE – Museo delle Scienze, Trento)

The Earth's biological systems have been continuously evolving but causes, dynamics and consequences of changes in the Anthropocene are difficult to ascertain. The limits of resilience of biota to recent environmental changes are unknown, raising the possibility of enhanced biodiversity loss. The relationships among environmental changes, ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity have emerged as a central issue in environmental sciences. However, an enormous gap has separated the world of Environmental scientists who deal with time scales of day to decades, from that of Geoscientists, who think in thousands to millions of years. Understanding of the Earth system at time scales longer than human observations has become imperative, because anthropogenic activities are likely to telescope by order of magnitude the rates of climatic change that usually result from geologic processes. The session aims at contributing to the major issue of recent global changes impacting ecosystems: we expect presentations on terrestrial and oceanic examples of ecosystems functioning under stressed conditions in the Phanerozoic and other issues that contribute to the growing discipline of Conservation Paleobiology.


P2. Deciphering ancient paleoenvironmental perturbations and their impact on the marine ecosystems

Proposers: Francesco Dela Pierre (Univ. Torino), Marcello Natalicchio (Univ. Torino), Francesca Lozar (Univ. Torino), Alessandra Negri (Università Politecnica delle Marche)

The history of Earth's oceans is punctuated by dramatic environmental perturbations that strongly affected the marine ecosystems, at global and basin scale. These paleoceanographic events likely commenced from the confluence of various causes including changes of water salinity, sediment nutrient supply, water mass circulation and oxygenation, temperature fluctuations, and light attenuation. Common effects on the oceans were thought to be hypersalinity, water column stratification anoxia or euxinia with lethal consequences for most eukaryotes adapted to normal marine conditions. In great contrast, some prokaryotes, especially those from the versatile bacterial and archaeal domains, apparently can take advantage from such extreme conditions and often represent the only biota able to thrive. In addition, intensification of water column stratification results in the formation of a chemocline, where the coexistence of reduced chemical compounds (e.g. sulfide, methane, ammonium) and oxidants may stimulate microbial metabolism; on the other hand, microorganisms play a crucial role in biogeochemical cycles (e.g. carbon, sulfur and nitrogen) and can virtually drive modifications of the water chemistry composition. Ancient sedimentary rocks, and especially evaporite and organic-rich deposits (black shales and sapropels), represent extraordinary paleoarchives for deciphering the history of the ancient oceans during the major environmental perturbations of the Earth and their impact on the biogeochemical cycles and on the marine ecosystems. The combination of different disciplines, including sedimentology, paleontology, geomicrobiology and geochemistry, is of great importance for interpreting the past record of such critical events. In this session we encourage contributions dealing with new data on ancient environmental critical events (e.g. salinity crises, anoxic events) that bring together different techniques including, but not limited to, sedimentology, petrography, isotopic signatures, body fossils, lipid biomarkers, major and trace element pattern.


P3. Timescales for measuring Earth Processes: from tectonic events to material ageing

Proposers: Massimo Tiepolo (Univ. Milano), Isabella Raffi (Univ. G. d'Annunzio, Chieti-Pescara), Mario Sprovieri (IAMC-CNR, Capo Granitola)

In Earth sciences the understanding and modeling of processes relies on accurate knowledge of geological time. The development of integrated methodologies for the quantification of time has become a central issue. Modern timescales rely on high-resolution chronostratigraphy, astrochronology and radiometric dates. The session is envisioned for gathering together geologists with a variety of expertise to discuss and integrate data for building a more coherent, precise and updated geological timescale.


P4. Biota evolution and Biomineralization

Proposers: Francesca Bosellini (Univ. Modena), Annalisa Ferretti (Univ. Modena), Roberto Barbieri (Univ. Bologna)

Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms produce biominerals, such as silicates in algae and diatoms, carbonates in invertebrates, and calcium phosphates and carbonates in the hard tissues of vertebrates. Several key-events in the history of life reflect the changing costs and benefits of skeletal biomineralization. It is also a phenomenon largely induced/controlled by bacteria and archaea. Paleontologists detect patterns of skeletal evolution and try to link paleontological insights to the molecular biology and physiology for reconstructing the history of the biosphere and interactions with biogeochemical cycling. We solicit presentations on biomineralization of micro- and macro-fossils as proxies for understanding the co-evolution of biota, the chemistry of marine and non-marine setting, and as recorder of paleoenvironmental conditions.


P5. Marine geohazards on the continental margins of Italy: the Magic Atlas

Proposers: Francesca Boudillon (IAMC-CNR, Napoli), Silvia Ceramicola (OGS, Trieste), Francesco Latino Chiocci (Univ. Roma La Sapienza), Fabiano Gamberi (ISMAR-CNR Bologna), Paolo Orrù (Univ. Cagliari)

Continental margins are shaped by a great variety of sedimentary, tectonic and volcanic processes that have different spatial distribution and time recurrence; some of them are or have been recently active, they can have superficial expression and for this reason make the seafloor a variegated and dynamic landscape. The most common include slide scars and deposits, canyon headscarps and steep erosional flanks, fault‐related seafloor unevenness, mud volcanoes, pockmarks, gravity flow deposits, erosional scours and bedforms. Some of these geomorphic features have been identified and examined during the Magic project and are now published in an Atlas. We welcome contributions from all the scientific community in order to examine and discuss the occurrence, triggers and consequences of geohazard‐related geomorphic processes at a regional scale.


P6. The role of Italian scientists and educators in the International Ocean and Continental Drilling Programs: major achievements and new perspective

Proposers: Claudia Lupi (Univ. Pavia), Annalisa Iadanza (DSSTTA-CNR), Marco Sacchi (IAMC-CNR), Fabio Florindo (INGV-Roma), Patrizia Ferretti (Univ. Venezia)

In the recent years, the Italian scientific community has strengthened its participation in the scientific drilling through the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). Thanks to substantial national funding dedicated to the Italian participation in European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) and a capillary work carried out by the IODP – Italia committee, an increasing number of Italian researchers has been recently involved in the whole spectrum of the activities of the drilling programs. This session invites contributions that present the impact of IODP expeditions and activities on the formation of scientists and educators and also illustrate/review recent scientific achievements highlighting the multidisciplinary topics, the quality of materials and the opportunity for high-profile collaborations. Moreover, we encourage contributions that outline perspectives and visions for future drilling projects and promote the dissemination of scientific information and discoveries.


P7. Onshore and offshore Quaternary sedimentary processes and sequences in the Mediterranean regions

Proposers: Sergio G. Longhitano (Univ. Basilicata), Francesco L. Chiocci (Univ. Roma La Sapienza), Marcello Tropeano (Univ. Bari), Domenico Chiarella (Royal Holloway, Univ. London), Marco Brandano (Univ. Roma La Sapienza)

The Quaternary is progressively revealing even new geological discoveries and challenging insights leading to open problems in the realm of the sedimentary and marine geology. In particular, the Mediterranean, because of its geological activity, is a scenario where sediment dynamics and depositional and biological processes play an important role in shaping past and modern environments. Such knowledge is useful up to exploit geo-resources and asses geohazards. This session attempts to provide a forum for discussing the most recent studies on onshore and offshore Quaternary key areas in the Mediterranean regions, with emphasis on field-based case studies, sequence-stratigraphic reconstructions and novel breakthroughs on sediment dynamics, environmental risks, depositional and biological processes developing on both terrestrial and marine settings. Offshore-to-onshore correlations, as well as regional and international contributions are strongly encouraged.


P8. The dynamics of sedimentary processes in coastal areas

Proposers: Massimo Moretti (Univ. Bari), Daniela Ruberti (Univ. Campania-L. Vanvitelli), Vincenzo Pascucci (Univ. Sassari)

This session focuses on the physical aspects related with erosive and depositional processes in the coastal environments. The session analyses the role of storm-waves, tides and currents in the short and long-term morpho-sedimentary evolution of coastal areas ranging from transitional to shallow-sea environments. Studies on ancient shallow-sea successions, present-day examples and numerical-analogical approaches are encouraged as well as interdisciplinary contributions that analyze the interactions between physical and biological processes in the sediment dynamics including the human impact on the coastal evolution.


P9. From analogue to digital geological mapping: opportunities and risks in the use of new tools

Proposers: Mauro Agate (Univ. Palermo), Michele Zucali (Univ. Milano), Chiara D'Ambrogi (ISPRA, Roma)

Geological maps are an irreplaceable synthesis tool for the physical knowledge of the territory: the increasingly intense and widespread use of the soil and the subsoil in various application fields calls for an updated and quality cartographic production
Nowadays geological mapping can use computer methodologies that allow the three-dimensional restitution of geological models and help the integration of multiple geological themes, satisfying the knowledge needs of the end user. The session aims to:
- gather scientific contributions from the world of research, industry and local authorities, which illustrate the possibilities offered by multimedia computer techniques to represent in an integrated way the geological structure of the surface and the subsoil;
- promote a comparison on the problematic aspects that accompany the development of the modern digital cartography: i) the need for the constant updating of the basic geological mapping, ii) the check and the homogeneity of the subsurface data from boreholes and geophysical surveys, iii) the improvement of the spatial interpolation and interrogation of databases algorithms designed in accordance with international descriptive standards.


P10. Tectonic and sedimentation relationships in Mediterranean basins and belts. A tribute to Fabio Lentini

Proposers: Agata Di Stefano (Univ. Catania), Rosanna Maniscalco (Univ. Catania)

Invited speaker: Rob Butler – University of Aberdeen (UK)

The session deals with sedimentary basins and orogens of the Mediterranean region and gives an overview of the interplay between tectonics and sedimentation in different geodynamic settings from rifting to continental collision. Nowadays sedimentary basins and orogenic areas must be studied as geodynamic entities and with a multidisciplinary approach. Therefore the session welcomes oral contributions on sedimentary character of basins, basin stratigraphy and biostratigraphy, tectonic control on sedimentation, and seismic stratigraphy. The session is dedicated to professor Fabio Lentini, who devoted his working life to the study of Mediterranean orogens.


P11. Faulting and folding across the scales. How, where, and why the lithosphere deforms

Proposers: Fabrizio Balsamo (Univ. Parma), Stefano Tavani (Univ. Napoli-Federico II), Stefano Zanchetta (Univ. Milano Bicocca), Massimo Mattei (Univ. Roma Tre)

Invited speaker: Fabio Corbi – GFZ Potsdam (GE); Paola Vannucchi -  Royal Holloway, University of London (UK)

The understanding of fold- and fault-related deformation pattern at different scales is a useful tool for plate tectonics reconstructions and to study the seismicity of a region. Furthermore, deformation in the lithosphere, whether in brittle or ductile environment, provides pathways for fluid migration and mineralisation, thus impacting the exploitation of Earth's natural resources. Therefore, the understanding of how, where and when lithosphere deforms is of paramount importance for both academic and practical uses. In this session we invite the geological community to discuss lithosphere deformation properties using different methodological approaches and different scales of observations. Field, laboratory and theoretical studies are welcome.


P12. The role of shear zones in the tectono-metamorphic evolution of the lithosphere: insights from microfabric to mountain belt structures

Proposers: Rodolfo Carosi (Univ. Torino), Eugenio Fazio (Univ. Catania), Salvatore Iaccarino (Univ. Torino), Chiara Montòmoli (Univ. Pisa)

Keynote speakers: G. Viola (Univ. Bologna), T. Scheiber, B. Bingen

Crustal scale shear zones are very important structures, which play a crucial role in the tectono-metamorphic evolution of the lithosphere, since they preferentially accommodate deformation with respect to the surrounding portions. Primary physical and thermal perturbations usually activate ductile shear zones where rock anisotropies, lattice- and shape-preferred orientations (SPO and LPO) of syn-tectonically re-crystallized minerals can drive the evolution of metamorphic processes in both collisional and extensional regimes. "Weaker domains", often due to initial viscosity contrast or other strain softening mechanisms, occur also during the syn-tectonic emplacement of mid-crustal plutons where deformation is concentrated as testified by the development of anastomosing shear zones. Moreover, these kilometer-sized tabular high strain zones have been widely studied in the past decades as they represent also preferential channels for fluid flow, driving metamorphic reactions and/or controlling their kinetics and controlling the ore-deposits formation. Contributions dealing with field mapping, structural analyses spanning from micro-scale to mega-scale, thermobarometrical, thermochronological and geochronological investigations on shear zones are welcomed in this session.


P13. Tectono-metamorphic processes from micro-scale to plate margins: Geological, Geophysical and Petrological approaches in unravelling the evolution of metamorphic terrains in collisional belts

Proposers: Gaetano Ortolano (Univ. Catania), Anna Maria Marotta (Univ. Milano), Maria Iole Spalla (Univ. Milano)

The recent development in the numerical quantification of geological processes has opened new and interesting frontiers, which are tracing new interdisciplinary routes particularly useful in the unravelling of the orogenic tectonic processes. The investigation of the metamorphic terrains, backbone and skeleton of the collisional belts, surely represents an active interaction gym between those geoscience disciplines able to integrate geological, geophysical and petrological processes in a synergic framework, which focuses on the numerical modeling in the broader meaning of the term: from the micro- (e.g. thermodynamic modeling, diffusional processes, geospeedometry) up to the lithospheric-scale (e.g. thermo-mechanical models). The proposed session therefore intends to compare new methods developed in the field of numerical modeling for the study of tectonic and metamorphic processes with data obtained via thermodynamic modeling based on a detailed textural study, increasingly anchored to objective numerical parameters, such as those arising from numerical elaboration of X-ray images. Multidisciplinary contributions of geological, geophysical and petrological nature are also welcome as well as innovative methods in each of the above fields.


P14. Georesources and Energy for the XXI Century

Proposers: Fabrizio Agosta (Univ. Basilicata), Roberto Gambini (ENEL), Sergio G. Longhitano (Univ. Basilicata), Stefano Mazzoli (Univ. Napoli Federico II), Giorgio Minelli (Univ. Perugia), Emanuele Tondi (Univ. Camerino), Pierluigi Vecchia (Strata GeoResearch srl), Emilio Tebaldi (ENI)

Key-note speakers: Atilla Aydin (Stanford University, USA)
Invited Speaker: Valentina Marzia Rossi, University of Bergen, winner of the Petroleum Geology Student Contest 2017

This multi-disciplinary session is aimed at discussing cutting edge research findings in the fields of fossil and renewable underground energy resources, CO2 storage, and their management in terms of productivity and environmental vulnerability and sustainability. It is intended as a scientific platform to present studies focused on various kinds of processes relevant for geo-energy related applications. Themes include, but are not limited to, regional geology, basin analysis, sequence stratigraphy, sedimentology, fault and fracture analysis, seismology, petrophysics and formation evaluation, reservoir modeling, and fluid flow simulation. The session is targeted to researchers, postgraduates, graduates, and professionals of the industry dealing with the challenge of providing reliable supplies of affordable energy in environmentally sustainable ways. The attendees are encouraged to share their experience and inspiring ideas, in order to disseminate knowledge-based practices on both exploration and development of subsurface reservoirs of geofluids.


P15. Outcrop analogues in exploration and production

Proposers: Domenico Chiarella (Royal Holloway, Univ. London), Massimo Rossi (ENI)

Outcrop analogues are key elements in the understanding of reservoir architecture and heterogeneities. Since the pioneering works of the 1960s to the high-tech virtual outcrop methodologies of today, outcrop analogues have played a central role in improving understanding of subsurface reservoir architectures. During the session, aspects like geobody size, geometry and connectivity, as well as dimensions, form and distribution of faults and fractures will be discussed. Contributions providing case studies showing the value of analogues in exploration and production are welcome. The session is multidisciplinary and is open to contribute focusing on clastic and carbonate systems studied from both sedimentological and structural point of view.


P16. Integrated studies of recent and active deformations onland and offshore

Proposers: Massimiliano Barchi (Univ. Perugia), Pierfrancesco Burrato (INGV, Roma 1), Luigi Ferranti (Univ. Napoli-Federico II), Fabrizio Pepe (Univ. Palermo), Marco Sacchi (IAMC-CNR, Napoli)

The characterization of active tectonic belts can greatly benefit from the integration of surface data with subsurface geological and geophysical information. The latter, in particular, becomes vital in the case of offshore tectonic structures. In the Central Mediterranean, as well as in many regions worldwide, recent (Pliocene-Quaternary) and active tectonic belts often develop across or within the transition zone between marine and continental areas (e. g. the northern and southern Apennine front; the Dinaric-Hellenic front; the foreland strike-slip fault belts of the Apulian and Sicilian regions; the transfer strike-slip faults in the southern Tyrrhenian and eastern Ionian seas). In these situations, comprehension of deformation structures requires the integration of analysis criteria and information adopted and developed both in the onland and in the submerged realm. We seek contributions based on different geological and geophysical approaches, scales and resolutions, aimed at linking the shallow and deep expression of active structures generated in different tectonic regimes (contractional, extensional and transcurrent). We particularly welcome studies on the structural architecture of active belts developed across the transition zone between marine and continental areas, and can have impact on comprehension of deformation in both realms.


P17. Tectonic and geodynamic control on large earthquakes and complex earthquake sequences: case studies from Italy and not only

Proposers: Giuseppina Lavecchia (Univ. G. D'Annunzio, Chieti-Pescara), Giancarlo Neri (Univ. Messina), Roberto Scarpa (Univ. Salerno), Riccardo Caputo (Univ. Ferrara)

Sponsored by CRUST (Centro inteRUniverstitario per l'analisi Sismotettonica Tridimensionale con applicazioni territoriali)

The fully integrated structural-geological and seismological study of early-instrumental and instrumental earthquakes, preferably with a three-dimensional multi-source and multi-scale approach, offers a twofold opportunity for scientific progress:
1) on the one hand, it may allow to deepen and constrain the knowledge on the shallow and deep fault geometry in the study region, on the crust rheology and deformation style, on the modalities of interconnection of active fault systems with various hierarchies, on the geodynamic context etc;
2) on the other hand, it may allow to rebuild realistic seismic source models, also for moderate sequences, and to understand the modalities of evolution in space and time of large seismic events, isolated or cascaded, and the tectonic and dynamic control played on their evolution. Interdisciplinary contributions on the above issues and related ones, applied to case studies from Italy and elsewhere, are solicited. Tectonic and rheological control on large earthquakes and seismic sequences.


P18. Tectonics and geodynamics of the central Mediterranean area: evidence from geophysics

Proposers: Fabio Speranza (INGV, Roma) and Claudio Chiarabba (INGV, Roma), Mimmo Palano (INGV, Catania), Sveva Corrado (Univ. Roma Tre)

Located between the African and European plates, Sicily represents one of the most complex pieces of the Mediterranean micro-plate puzzle. Most of Sicily forms the easternmost Maghrebian chain sector, while the NE Sicily corner belongs to the Calabro-Peloritan block. To the SE, the Hyblean plateau is considered to be the northernmost emerged piece of the undeformed African plate. The seas surrounding Sicily formed similarly after different geodynamics: while the Ionian Sea is thought to be the last survivor of the Permo-Triassic Neo-Tethys Ocean, the southern Tyrrhenian Sea spread as a back-arc basin in late Miocene times, and -finally - intra-plate syn-rift processes are occurring since late Miocene times in the Sicily Channel. Geophysical data are clearly instrumental to try unravelling such highly complex tectonic setting, and should represent the benchmarks for tectonic and geodynamic interpretation. This session welcomes all kind of land and marine geophysical data contributing to unveil more in detail the tectonics of Sicily and its surrounding seas. Gravimetric, magnetic, seismic reflection and refraction data are clearly invited as they yield Moho depths, crustal setting, and geometry of the nappe pile, while paleomagnetic data are expected to give rotations occurring during orogenic shortening. In addition, paleothermal and LT thermo-chronological dataset to constrain burial-exhumation evolution during the chain building are also solicited. Seismological and geodetic data (both land- and satellite-based such as GNSS and InSAR) are also of paramount relevance, as they illuminate present-day crust kinematics that not necessarily reflects the kinematics occurring during the last Myrs. Finally, all kind of geophysical / geological contributions focusing on tectonics scenarios that constrain seismic hazard are particularly welcomed.


P19. Mediterranean subduction zones: from deep mantle to shallow structure and volcanism

Proposers: Claudio Chiarabba (INGV, Roma), Michele Lustrino (Univ. Roma La Sapienza), Riccardo Avanzinelli (Univ. Firenze)

Subduction, continent-continent collision, mountain chain building, oceanization, strike slip tectonics, back-arc and inter-arc basin opening are processes occurred in the Mediterranean area during a relatively short time (<40 Myr), often contemporaneously and with complex temporal relations. The engine of these tectonic changes is not exactly known, and the ultimate sources of the associated abundant igneous products, characterized by extremely variable chemical compositions, are even more debated. This session aims to attract papers dealing with the evolution of the Mediterranean subduction as imaged from geological, geophysical, geochemical and modeling.


P20. Geodynamic evolution between the Variscan and Alpine orogeneses: clues from mantle features and magmatic events

Proposers: Federico Casetta (UniFE), Angelo De Min (Univ. Trieste), Valentina Brombin (Univ. Ferrara)

Invited: A. Marzoli (Univ. Padova), A. Zanetti (IGG-CNR, Pavia)

After the Variscan orogeny, several distinct magmatic episodes took place and shaped the Northern Adriatic area, contributing to generate the nowadays configuration. Attracting scientist since the birth of petrography, these magmatic provinces are among the most fascinating and articulated regions worldwide, being constituted by huge amounts of mafic to extremely differentiated plutons, dyke swarms and volcanic/volcanoclastic sequences with variable geochemical affinities. This session focuses on the interpretation of the magmatic events between the Variscan and Alpine orogenic cycles, embracing all the geochemical, petrologic, geochronological, tectono-magmatic, and geodynamic contributions to the rediscovery of these intriguing regions.


P21. The nature of the crust-mantle transition and its effects on the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution

Proposers: Roberto Braga (Univ. Bologna), Valentina Magni (UiO, Oslo), Claudio Natali (Univ. Ferrara)

The crust-mantle transition is a complex feature of the lithosphere, often characterized by intermixing of mantle and crustal rocks. Deep crust-mantle sections exhumed in orogenic belts, studies of crustal and mantle xenoliths brought to the surface by volcanic activity, as well as geophysical and numerical modeling provide insightful information on the nature of this transition. The structure, petrology, geochemistry, and rheology of the crust-mantle transition are key features that affect the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution. A key challenge is to unravel the processes responsible for the mechanical coupling/decoupling between the lower crust and underlying lithospheric mantle. If involved in melting processes, a heterogeneous crust-mantle transition could represent a suitable source region for exotic magma types and the ideal site for mass transfer between crustal and mantle reservoirs. Understanding crust-mantle transitions requires gathering scientists from different backgrounds and expertise encompassing, for example: structural, microstructural, petrochronological, thermodynamic and geochemical studies, as well as new insights from recent advances in seismic studies and numerical geodynamic modeling and "big data" analysis. We thus invite contributions that will lead to an exciting and multidisciplinary session where to discuss different interpretations and spark fresh synergies across a wide range of earth sciences topics.


P22. Melt/fluid-rock interaction and migration from the mantle to the surface

Proposers: Giulio Borghini (Univ. Milano), Martina Casalini (Univ. Firenze), Tommaso Giovanardi (Univ. Modena-Reggio Emilia), Barbara Faccini (Univ. Ferrara), Sciarra Alessandra (INGV, Roma)

Invited: A. Montanini (Univ. Parma), E. Rampone (Univ. Genova), A. Sanfilippo (Univ. Pavia), A. Langone (IGG-CNR, Pavia), A.L. Rizzo (INGV, Palermo)

The session is partly the results of two PRIN2015 founded projects ("Melt-rock reaction and melt migration in the MORB mantle through combined natural and experimental studies" and "Geochemical and isotopic budget of highly metasomatised sub-continental mantle and related geodynamic systems: modern and fossil analogues"). It focuses on the depletion and enrichment processes that develop mineral and geochemical heterogeneities within the mantle. Magma formation at ocean ridges is the primary process that produces the large scale lithologic and chemical heterogeneity of the Earth's mantle. Different lines of evidence, i.e. the chemical variability of oceanic basalts, the lithologic and geochemical heterogeneity observed in exposed mantle sections, and melting experiments on peridotite and pyroxenite lithologies, consistently indicate that the mantle sources of basaltic magmatism are heterogeneous at all spatially scales, and include both refractory, and variably enriched domains. Mantle metasomatism and refertilization governs the elemental and isotopic transfer among different geochemical reservoirs, being one of the main causes of pronounced heterogeneity. Heavily metasomatised continental mantle domain are able to produce extremely enriched magmatic compositions with peculiar geochemical and isotopic signatures. Fluids (melts and volatiles) play also a fundamental role in all the above described processes, plus subsolidus re-equilibration, magma degassing, fault lubrication and rheology, magnitude and style of eruptions, etc. At mantle depth volatiles are difficult to be measured, while gas emitted in volcanic and non-volcanic areas can be easily quantified and analyzed for their chemical and isotope composition, which are especially important for seismic and volcano monitoring. The session aims at integrating field, petrological and geochemical studies on ophiolitic, orogenic and oceanic mantle sequences and xenoliths with experimental investigations, to explore the major processes of basalt formation. The session also welcome petrological and geochemical studies of highly enriched magmas, metasomatised fossil mantle portions and tectonic and paleomagnetic studies to reconstruct the nature and timescale of the main geodynamic processes that have governed melting vs metasomatic processes. Any contribution related to the i) assessment of volatiles composition in the mantle, such as NAMs, melts and fluid inclusions in mantle minerals or in phenocrysts, ii) geochemical studies of gaseous emissions in volcanic, non-volcanic, and seismic areas, hydrothermal systems, mud volcanoes, sedimentary-hosted hydrothermal systems are also highly appreciated. The final aim is the creation of a bridge between scientists using different approaches, modeling and way of thinking, in order to create a new integrate vision able to link deep to superficial processes.


P23. Magma genesis and transport

Proposers: Pier Paolo Giacomoni (Univ. Ferrara), Gabriele Lanzafame (Elettra, Trieste), Cristina Perinelli (Univ. Roma La Sapienza)

Invited: G. Iezzi (Univ. G. d'Annunzio, Chieti-Pescara), M. Masotta (Univ. Pisa), M. Gaeta (Univ. Roma La Sapienza)

In the last decades significant progresses have been made for elucidating fundamental processes such as crystallization, mixing, assimilation, residence, extraction, bubbling, ascent rate and flow dynamics of magmas and lavas. These achievements were made possible by integrating spatial distribution and morphological features of crystals, vesicles and glasses with the estimation of intensive variables (P-T-fO2-aH2O) quantified by means of micro-chemical analysis of major, minor and trace elements, as well as 2D-3D imaging studies. In this way the spectrum of processes recorded by the textural, chemical and isotopic characteristics of the erupted products can provide crucial information on the timescales of the processes occurring before eruption, although the dynamic and evolution of the magmatic systems remains a matter of active debate. This session is intended to bring together a full spectrum of contributions dealing with the dynamic and timescales of magma differentiation, storage, contamination and ascent, inviting presentations deriving from both laboratory experiments and field observations. The aim of the session is to improve our understanding of the physico-chemical changes experienced by magmas at pre-, syn-, and post-eruptive conditions, using petrographic, geochemical, mineralogical and volcanological features of magmatic rocks and their synthetic analogues. The integration of diverse datasets on active volcanic systems will also provide the key feature for exploring the link between deep-seated magma reservoirs and erupted products, that will improve our understanding of the 'volcano-magma' system as a whole, with meaningful outcomes to hazard assessment.


P24. Volatiles in magmas: solubility models and degassing processes. A tribute to Marcello Carapezza

Proposers: Paolo Papale (INGV, Pisa), Mariano Valenza (Univ. Palermo)

The behavior of volatiles in magmas plays governing roles on the physico-chemical evolution of magmas, on deep magma dynamics, and on the eruption dynamics. Monitoring volcanic fluids is among the major components of modern volcano monitoring systems, as variations in physico-chemical quantities characterizing volcanic fluids relate to changes in P-T-X conditions at depth, and can reveal magmatic movements. Understanding the physics and chemistry of volatile-melt-crystal-rock-geothermal fluid interactions, and the controlling roles of volatiles on magma and eruption dynamics, is therefore a major aspect of both volcano science and volcanic hazard forecasts. This session invites contributes presenting the state-of-the art and the most recent developments in modelling and understanding i) the physics and chemistry of volatile exsolution and degassing, ii) the evolution of volcanic gas from their source regions through the magma/rock/geothermal systems to the Earth surface, iii) the complex roles of volatiles in magma and eruption dynamics. Fundamental investigation and modelling studies, and their application to real volcanic systems and to volcanic hazard forecasts, are equally welcome.


P25. Computational thermodynamics of magmas, melting and vaporization processes

Proposers: Donato Belmonte (Univ. Genova), James A.D. Connolly (ETH, Zürich)

Computational thermodynamics is essential to predict and quantify the physico-chemical properties of silicate melts. Prediction and quantification accomplished by a combination of first principles simulations, experimental data assessment and classical thermodynamics provides insights into melting and crystallization processes, magma genesis and differentiation and impact processes as well. The aim of this session is to bring together the most recent advances on melt thermodynamics with particular focus on the calculation of phase diagrams, solid-liquid-vapor phase equilibria and melting phase relations from shallow to deep (and primordial to current) terrestrial conditions. Specific contributions on rheological and transport properties of melts are also welcome.


P26. Linking deep and surface processes: advances in volcanology from a multidisciplinary perspective

Proposers: Mimmo Palano (INGV, Catania), Antonio Paonita (INGV, Palermo), Matteo Trolese (Univ. Roma Tre)

Volcanic processes encompass an impressive range of geochemical, petrological, geophysical and geological signatures. Our capacity to monitor and understand active volcanoes has been greatly enhanced by the continuous development of a large number of disciplines and approaches aimed to detect and study these signatures. At the same time, our current understanding of how volcanoes work is incomplete. How do eruptions initiate, evolve and end? How long does it take for magma to reach the surface and which conditions determine whether magma will erupt? Are there any unrest patterns that may be used to predict a future eruption? Answering these long-standing challenges requires an interdisciplinary approach combining monitoring of active volcanoes, studies on past eruptions and the development of quantitative models of volcanic processes. This session aims at bringing together a multidisciplinary audience to discuss the integration of volcanological observations and monitoring data, in order to advance available methods and models and, in turn, to better understand the dynamics of volcanoes.


P27. Volcano Hazard Monitoring

Proposers: Ciro Del Negro (INGV, Catania), Fabrizio Ferrucci (The Open University, UK), Alexis Hérault (Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers, France)

Volcanic eruptions present a wide variety of hazardous phenomena that may occur within short timeframes, travel at high speed, impact on very large areas, and extend to large distances from volcanoes undergoing severe unrest. Lava and pyroclastic flows, with associated phenomena such as eruptive columns, volcanic aerosols and debris avalanche-triggered tsunamis, are the most relevant such hazards. Quantifying these hazards by combining field observations, satellite data and numerical modelling finds immediate application to the real-time monitoring of eruptive events. By monitoring, we mean here both following the manifestations of the eruption once it has started, as well as forecasting the areas potentially threatened by hazardous phenomena in an eruptive scenario. The need for integrated and efficient monitoring systems, operating at a global scale, and including tools for producing different scenarios as eruptive conditions change, is a primary challenge for volcanic hazard assessment. Today, a near-realtime, satellite-driven, inverse-and-direct modelling strategy has become realistic. It can be embodied by an operational monitoring system providing syn-eruptive products as (i) the current state of the activity; (ii) the probable evolution(s) of hazardous phenomena associated to the actual eruption, and (iii) the potential impact scenario. This session aims to bringing together the remote sensing, the modelling and the emergency response communities within a joint, volcanic hazard focus.


P28. Minerals at non-ambient conditions: A Snapshot of the Earth and other planetary bodies

Proposers: Paola Comodi (Univ. Perugia), Matteo Alvaro (Univ. Pavia)

From prospecting and exploration of ore deposits to the mitigation of geological hazards, most of the fundamental open questions can be answered only by understanding of the processes occurring in a dynamic planet such as the Earth and/or other planetary bodies. Investigation of the behavior of minerals at non-ambient conditions (e.g. pressure, temperature, oxygen fucacity etc...) allows understanding their stability conditions and possible transformation occurring at depth. These knowledges provide a snapshot of the Earth's interior at the atomic scale that allows to place constraints on the processes governing the dynamic of a planet at a much larger scale. The session is open to contributions where theoretical and experimental approaches are used to investigate natural samples and/or synthetic analogue phases under non-ambient conditions with the aim of interpreting processes occurring in the Earth and other planetary bodies.


P29. Geomaterials: Nature, properties and technology

Proposers: Francesco Di Benedetto (Univ. Firenze), Rocco Laviano (Univ. Bari), Paolo Lotti (Univ. Milano)

Minerals and their synthetic counterparts are key materials in a wide range of applications of industrial, environmental, economic and societal interest. This session is intended to survey the properties, the processes and the occurrences, which make geomaterials relevant for technology and society. The session will be open, but not restricted, to contributions dealing with forensic mineralogy, relevant properties of building materials, ceramics, micro- and nanoporous compounds, geopolymers, nano, glassy and fibrous materials, as wells as sustainability of raw and waste materials and of mining and beneficiation processes.


P30. Puzzle crystallography of inorganic structures. A tribute to Fiorenzo Mazzi

Proposers: Roberta Oberti (IGG-CNR, Pavia), Maria Chiara Domeneghetti (Univ. Pavia)

Since the beginning of his career (in the fifthies), Fiorenzo Mazzi had a special feeling for intricate but intriguing minerals and materials. To solve what he called "crystallographic puzzles", he wrote since the early seventies a variety of unique PC programs for structure refinement which were made available to the crystallographic community in Pavia and elsewhere. He would have loved listening which kinds of intricate problems can presently be solved using the "extended" crystallographic approaches aimed at deciphering not only the structure but also the properties of minerals and their analogues.


P31. Zeolites and porous materials: Unravelling the relations between crystal-chemistry, stability, structure and properties

Proposers: Rossella Arletti (Univ. Torino), Annalisa Martucci (Univ. Ferrara)

This session covers the crystal-chemistry of both natural and synthetic porous materials (such as zeolites, clay minerals, and assemblies of oxide nanoparticles), as well as their utilizations, synthesis, properties, and occurrence. Zeolites represent a class of well-known minerals and materials with a high potential for industrial utilizations. Classical fields are detergent additives, catalysts in cracking processes of the petroleum refining industry and as molecular sieves in environmental applications, soil improvement and waste treatment. In Material Science, investigations aiming to obtain new types of porous materials, inspired by the mineral structures, have opened an essential field of research. The goal of this session is to provide a platform for mineralogy and petrology researchers as well as for crystallographers and material scientists to discuss new insights in mineralogy, crystal-chemistry, stability, structure and properties of both natural and synthetic porous materials, as well as innovative aspects in their processing and applications. We particularly wish to highlight contributions that explore physical, chemical and structural characterization of porous materials, synthesis of crystalline phases with pores in the appropriate range, structure-property relationships at ambient conditions, but also at low and high temperatures and/or at high pressures, adsorption and diffusion of mobile species in porous materials, host/guest interactions and confinement effects, ion exchange, modelling in geological and environmental processes, new insights in processing and applications.


P32. Environmental and medical mineralogy: from molecular to macro scale processes

Proposers: Elena Belluso (Univ. Torino), Pilario Costagliola (Univ. Firenze), Franco Frau (Univ. Cagliari)

Environmental and medical mineralogy investigates the relationship between minerals and human health, thus covering a broad interdisciplinary field positioned between mineralogy, geochemistry, geology and medicine. Research strategies and methods include (but are not limited to) processes that explore the interactions between the environment and minerals, also including minerals of the human body, from the molecular to the macro scale. This session solicits contributions from a wide community of scientists involved in studying and understanding the complex relationships occurring between natural or anthropogenic environments and any type of mineral.


P33. Mineralogy, waste management and environmental pollution

Proposers: Mario Tribaudino (Univ. Parma), Luciana Mantovani (Univ. Parma), Valerio Funari (ISMAR-CNR, Bologna)

Mineral and mineral behavior are major actors in human civilization and in global cycles, organic and inorganic. It is hard to find any ecological system, which, at some stage, does not have the interaction with a mineral surface. As well as the natural ones, also man-made, anthropogenic minerals, show strong interactions with biological life. In a way, the dark side of human civilization, i.e. waste and environmental pollution, is related to mineral management and poorly known reactions with the biosphere. The purpose of the proposed session is to gather the contributions on characterization and properties of the minerals in wastes and polluted environments. Analytical studies, applicative projects on inertization, recycling and reuse, description of the global cycling of minerals and related chemical constituents, as well as the role of toxic elements in waste management are welcomed.


P34. Serpentinites: the environmental challenge

Proposers: Giovanna Rizzo (Univ. Basilicata), Michele Paternoster (Univ. Basilicata), Rosa Sinisi (Univ. Basilicata)

Serpentinites are the result of the alteration of mafic and ultramafic rocks occurring in different tectonic and geological contexts. These rocks are sadly known because of their significant contents of asbestos-like minerals that can be easily released into the environment as a consequence of both natural processes and anthropogenic activities. In addition high concentrations of trace elements, such as Ni, Cr, Co, Fe, characterize the serpentinite rocks and their minerals (silicates as well as oxides), which serve as host phases for these specific trace metals. A number of examples of naturally Cr-polluted water resources feed by serpentinite aquifers worldwide occur representing one of the most important environmental concerns. This session will welcome contributions on petrology and mineralogy of the rocks involved in the serpentinization processes of oceanic mafic bodies as much as on geochemistry of water and fluids interacting with them. The main aim is to give new data and new research perspectives to a wide scientific audience that more and more often is called to support the local organizations about the comprehension of (natural) geological hazards and the management of sites and water resources dangerous for human health.


P35. Environmental pollution related to occurrences of asbestos and asbestiform minerals in geo-matrices

Proposers: Rosalda Punturo (Univ. Catania), Andrea Bloise (Univ. Calabria), Carmine Apollaro (Univ. Calabria), Carmela Vaccaro (Univ. Ferrara)

A crucial theme of interest related to enviromental pollution is the enhanced mobilization of asbestos or asbestiform minerals affecting soils and rocks, due to human activities (e.g., road construction, excavation, plowing, mining) in comparison with natural weathering processes. Moreover, when weathering affects basic and ultrabasic rocks, some naturally occurring potentially harmful elements (e.g., Cr, Ni, Co, V) become enriched in waters and soils. The proposed session aims to bring together the diverse experiences of workgroups, included agencies for territory monitoring and specialists of the sector, pointing at collaboration for solution and management of environmental and health problems related to the deterioration of geo-matrices.


P36. Geosciences for Cultural Heritages

Proposers: Fabrizio Antonelli (Univ. IUAV, Venezia), Alberto De Bonis (Univ. Wien), Domenico Miriello (Univ. Calabria), Simona Raneri (Univ. Pisa)

The main aim of this session is to increase knowledge and promote the debates on the role of Geosciences in cultural heritage studies. Approaches such as mineralogy, petrology, material science, geochemistry, geophysics, geoarchaeology, and geomorphology can indeed serve to explore several aspects of the architectural, archaeological and fine arts contexts. Ancient buildings, artifacts and findings are, in fact, mainly made of natural and artificial materials obtained from geological resources. Therefore, a proper characterization of these materials should not exclude the support of geosciences, for provenance and technology studies, diagnosis of conservation state, and application of good preservation strategies. Analytical methods focused on the knowledge of materials of the cultural heritage (CH) and archaeological artifacts usually produce a large number of datasets. For this reason additional methods, such as geostatistic tools, can provide an adequate support for the management of these data. Finally, besides the characterization of materials from archaeological sites and historical buildings, an appropriate planning of preservation strategies is also required by using innovative materials and products, as well as appropriate digital documentation for a long term fruition of CH via geomatics tools. Researchers of the archaeometry and cultural heritage community, such as geoscientists, chemists, physicists, engineers, material scientists, archaeologists, architects, conservators and restorers, are invited to present their contributes.


P37. Mining sites: from industrial heritage to cultural heritage

Proposers: Roberta Carta (ISPRA, Roma), Marco Di Leginio (ISPRA, Roma), Fiorenzo Fumanti (ISPRA, Roma), Maria Lettieri (ISPRA, Roma), Agata Patanè (ISPRA, Roma), Manuel Ramello (AIPAI – Associazione Italiana per il Patrimonio Archeologico ed Industriale), Domenico Savoca (ANIM – Associazione Nazionale Ingegneri Minerari)

Sponsored by ISPRA

The extractions of mineral resources from mines and quarries has represented the main working activities of several Italian communities. Former mines throughout the country number around 2,990, according to public records going from 1870 to 2014. Several thousands are the closed quarries, many of these was used for the realization of the architectural and artistic beauties of the Italian cities.
Mining sites are cultural assets that fall within the natural, historical, artistic, landscaping, archaeological, cultural and industrial heritage to be protected and valued. In some case, the mining sites are rehabilitated as "open museums", eco-museums, mining parks, and so on. The recognition of cultural value will create increased awareness amongst professional workers and to the public.
In October 2015, a "Memorandum of Understanding" was signed between ISPRA, MISE, Lombardy region and the main Italian Mining Parks and Museums, for the establishment of the "National Network of Italian Mining Parks and Museums (ReMi)". The network aimed both at connecting all the sites involved in the recovery of abandoned mining areas as industrial heritage tourism resource of the territory, and also at strengthening the regulatory framework. It is intention to create a geo-data base on line to make possible an exchange of information among various contests singled out and to support the arrangement of a tourist route between parks, museum and mine eco-museum.
The session wants to be an exchange of view for stakeholder to make a point about the different problems linked to the following tasks:
- Mining sites still requiring a reclamation security and their prevision of restoration and exploitation
- Different kind of restoration/exploitation in Italy and best practices for museum planning and management of mining spaces
- Management model adopted in the different situation and difficulties connected to the absence of legal framework in reference to the transformation from "mining deposit" to "cultural deposit";
- The possibility of re-use of mining empty;
- Mine Waste Management
- Museum experiences in Europe


P38. Cave and karst studies: from ancient to modern processes

Proposers: Laura Sanna (Istituto di Biometeorologia CNR, Sassari), Mario Parise (Univ. Bari), Andrea Columbu (Univ. Bologna), Giuliana Madonia (Univ. Palermo), Marco Vattano (Univ. Palermo)

This session will bring together karst experts, and aims at being an exchange platform between scientists, practitioners and students that focus their researches on topics related to surface and underground karst environments and processes, with purposes such as: karst geomorphology and hydrogeology; cave deposits and underground geomicrobiology; speleogenesis and paleoclimate, paleoenvironmental and paleogeographic reconstructions; water geochemistry and cave minerals; environmental vulnerability and risk; monitoring systems applied to cave protection and conservation; climate change and the role of karst processes in the carbon cycle; etc.


P39. Pre-Holocene Relative sea level changes

Proposers: Fabrizio Antonioli (ENEA, Roma), Stefano Furlani (Univ. Trieste), Paolo Stocchi (NIOZ, The Nederland)

Reconstructions of former sea levels are important for identifying the meltwater contribution during deglaciation, the constraining parameters in Earth-Ice models, estimating past and present rates of spatially-variable vertical land motion, and understanding the sensitivity of sea-level rise to climate variations. In the Mediterranean sea many observational data have been published for the Holocene and MIS 5.5 highstand, or, in tectonically active coastal area to calculate vertical tectonic rates. This session welcomes contributions from coastal scientists interested in all observational data during MIS 2, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 or older. Observational data using different sea level markers and their comparisons with present-day levels are welcome. In the Mediterranean area, few studies, so far, have explicitly included the GIA contribution for the MIS 5.5 rsl fluctuations, so GIA contribution compared with observed data are particularly welcome.


P40. Coastal hazards in a global sea level change scenario

Proposers: Fabrizio Antonioli (ENEA, Roma), Marco Anzidei (INGV, Roma), Pietro Aucelli (Univ. Napoli Parthenope), Giuseppe Mastronuzzi (Univ. Bari)

Sea level rise is one of the main effects of climate change which is threating global coastal zones and hundreds of millions of people living along the shore of the oceans and seas, who become vulnerable to marine flooding. Global warming caused by human activity is a major contributor to this, and the natural or anthropogenic greenhouse gases emitted in the atmosphere play a key role in the increasing temperature, melting of ice caps, increasing intensities and frequencies of storm surges. These effects, and also tsunamis, will be even larger in submerging coasts. On these basis, the scientific community is focusing on coastal issues, like accelerating coastal erosion and beach retreat, land subsidence, the history of past sea levels and sea level projections for the next decades and the subsequent risk of flooding. This session will focus on local and regional case studies and innovative methodological approaches for the mitigation of coastal hazard linked to sea level rise, storm surges and tsunamis.


P41. The contribute of the quantitative and qualitative hydrogeology in the study and management of the water resources

Proposers: Francesco Fiorillo (Univ. Sannio), Sergio Rusi (Univ. G. d'Annunzio, Chieti-Pescara)

Sponsored by IAH, Italian Chapter

Quantitative hydrogeology is crucial for groundwater management, during normal periods and, especially, during droughts. Qualitative assessment of groundwater and the study of the phenomena that influence groundwater quality are equally important, especially in aquifers with high anthropic pressure. The purpose of the session is to present the state of art in Italy in the quantitative and qualitative assessment of groundwater resources, especially through: evaluation of the factors involved in hydrogeological balance and hydrogeochemical setting; statistical analysis; monitoring networks; models; methods for verification of results, also for the groundwater management during droughts. Spring and well hydrograph analyses, hydrogeological maps, model simulations and GIS data treatment are welcome studies in the session, involving mountainous, flat, and coastal areas.


P42. Natural and anthropogenic extreme waters: criticalities and perspectives

Proposers: Maddalena Pennisi (IGG-CNR, Pisa), Barbara Nisi (IGG-CNR, Pisa)

Waters exhibit a large range of variability in terms of physical and chemical features. The processes that control the formation of extreme waters, characterized by peculiar temperatures, pH, chemistry, redox conditions, salinity, and isotope composition of one or more dissolved elements/compounds, represent a challenge for the scientific community. Extreme waters are found in volcanic, geothermal, glacial, marine, lacustrine, marsh, evaporitic, mud volcano, ore and hydrocarbon-sourced (or others) environments, over a wide range of both geologic and climate conditions, although they can also be produced by human activities, i.e. seawater desalinization processes, landfill disposal, mining and industrial areas, urban or agricultural waste and radioactive disposal. Extreme waters are crucial in controlling the limits of microbial life on Earth, as they host organisms that survive in harsh and unlivable environments for human standards. This session aims at promoting a fruitful discussion on natural and anthropogenic extreme waters on the basis of recent and ongoing instrumental developments (classical and latest generation mass spectrometry, new couplings, chemical separation methods, etc.) that have allowed a revolution at the level of measurable enrichments, elements of interests and analyses of specific compounds. Examples of processes and interactions of the so-called end-member in hydrological systems and extremophile organisms at a national and over-national scale are mostly welcome.


P43. Monitoring of deformation of structures and ground surface displacements

Proposers: Claudia Meisina (Univ. Pavia), Luigi Guerriero (Univ. Sannio), Diego Di Martire (Univ. Napoli Federico II), Giuseppe Centolanza (Dares Technology, Castelldefels, Spain)

Sponsored by AIGA

This session will focus on the monitoring of deformation of structures and ground surface displacements carried out by using different types of systems and techniques. The measurement and recording of data related to the physical characteristics of the Earth surface is a crucial phase of any major project. The information, provided by these investigations, is an important element for the initial stages of a project planning. Therefore, the choice of the instruments and methods of measurement or the creation of a dedicated monitoring system depends upon the different types of deformation that will affect the method of stability analysis and consequently the whole deformation monitoring campaign. This session will present both current research and practical tools and applications, and are intended to be of interest to academic scientists and practitioners alike, particularly those working on engineering geology, civil engineering and land infrastructure management Authorities.


P44. Fast-moving landslides: criteria and methodologies of hazard zonation and monitoring

Proposers: Francesco Maria Guadagno (Univ. Sannio), Giovanna Pappalardo (Univ. Catania), Domenico Calcaterra (Univ. Napoli Federico II)

Sponsored by AIGA

This session is focused on the study of landslides with rapid evolution in space and time, even affecting cultural heritage, urban centers and strategic infrastructures. These movements, occurring in both soils and rocks, are of high scientific interest for their impact on the territorial management. In Italy, such phenomena are enhanced even by climate changes, mainly represented by frequent heavy rainfalls, and are cause of disasters especially in urban areas. For this reason, the session deals with methodological approaches for landslide hazard and risk assessment and related zonation for prevention works and remedial measures. Conventional and innovative technologies for surveys and monitoring are welcome, along with studies on temporal and spatial prediction of fast-moving landslides.


P45. Landslides: processes, prediction and impact on society and cultural heritage

Proposers: Giovanni Crosta (Univ. Milano Bicocca), Giovanna Pappalardo (Univ. Catania), Matteo Berti (Univ. Bologna), Micol Rossini (Univ. Milano Bicocca)

Landslides are among the geohazards with the most serious consequences for society and cultural heritage. Urban areas, new urban developments, industrial sites, natural and cultural heritage sites rae examples of extremely sensitive elements and environments. Many types of slope instabilities can be identified, each presenting different types of hazard and risk. Some aspects of slope instabilities are still debated, such as: their regional distribution and relevance; triggering and controlling factors, including possible climatic changes; style and state of past and present activity; hydrological boundary conditions; possible evolution and modelling; assessment of related hazard; influence of external anthropogenic factors and effects on structures. Study of slope and ground instabilities requires a multidisciplinary approach involving knowledge from geology, geomorphology, geomechanics, hydrology, hydro-geochemistry, and geophysics. This interdisciplinarity is one of the most stimulating factor in the study of landslides, This session is intended to provide an overview of the potential of new approaches, technologies, such as remote sensing, monitoring, laboratory testing and modelling, to improve: our knowledge on the mechanisms of different landslide types, and our capability to predict landslides, and their effects on society in general, and cultural heritage in particular.


P46. Earth surface processes and related hazards: mapping, modeling and validation strategies

Proposers: Edoardo Rotigliano (Univ. Palermo), Christian Conoscenti (Univ. Palermo), Chiara Calligaris (Univ. Trieste)

Sponsored by AIGEO

Geomorphological processes can be responsible for the shaping of the earth surface with a severity so high as to produce hazard conditions threating man and his activities. Hazard/susceptibility assessment and mapping by means of either heuristic or stochastic approaches allows nowadays to obtain accurate prediction images which can be exploited as effective tools in basin/regional scale risk management plans. However, the great advance in terms of available statistical methods, highly detailed source data for predictors and related needed computing powers, more and more requires a proper geomorphological rooting of the procedures, in terms of morphodynamic adequacy of the adopted landslide models. At the same time, validation strategies and procedures are nowadays to be considered as mandatories in any landslide hazard/susceptibility standard protocol, opening the need of a deeper insight into the issue of past/present/recurrent and/or normal/extreme triggering events.


P47. The urban landscape: geomorphological historical evolution, geomorphosites and high risk scenarios

Proposers: Maurizio Del Monte (Univ. Roma La Sapienza), Pierluigi Brandolini (Univ. Genova), Laura Melelli (Univ. Perugia)

Sponsored by AIGEO

In this session we propose to examine and discuss the following topics:
- Methods for geomorphological survey in areas urbanized and/or deeply modified by human activities.
- Detection of the geomorphological characteristics driving the choice of foundation places and the following development of urban towns.
- Geomorphological evolution over time of urban areas (and archaeological, historical, landscape relationships).
- Geological model of the nearest subsoil and anthropogenic deposits (interactions with geotechnics, hydrogeology, design of underground infrastructures).
- Evaluation and cartographic representation of geomorphological hazards in urban areas (and geomorphological risk management).
- Environmental and social value of urban waterways and relationships with the ecological quality evaluation.
- Promotion of cultural and geotouristic enhancement of urbanized areas, subject of interest of cognitive tourism focussed on inanimate nature sites.
- Methods to evaluate individual landforms values (geomorphological sites or geomorphosites) and the whole geomorphological heritage.


P48. Geoheritage and Landscape

Proposers: Paola Coratza (Univ. Modena-Reggio Emilia), Valeria Panizza (Univ. Sassari), Manuela Pelfini (Univ. Milano)

Sponsored by AIGEO - Sponsored by IAG

Geoheritage and Geosites are core concepts and tools both for the dissemination of Earth Science ideas and for the protection of unique and valuable landscapes, landforms, bed-rock features and natural geological materials, such as minerals and fossils. The importance of conserving geoheritage and landscape is now widely accepted and has been introduced into the European Landscape Convention and the EU Soil Strategy. These concepts are also generating discussion and interest, not only within researchers in Earth Sciences, but also with workers in biology, spatial planning, tourism and cultural heritage. Presentations are invited on the following issues (without strict limitation to these topics), that concern also transversaly the geosites (including geomorphosites): 1) Definitions (principles, approaches, context), 2) Assessment (mapping, assessment, classification and quantification), 3) Case studies of geoheritage, 4) Geoparks and geoheritage conservation, management and promotion, 5) Links and interactions between geoheritage, biodiversity and cultural diversity and heritage, 6) Geotourism and geoheritage conservation, management and promotion, including educational aspects of geoheritage. The session is co-organized by the Working Group on Geomorphosites and Lanscape of the Associazione Italiana di Geografia Fisica e Geomorfologia (AIGeo) and the Working Group on Geomorphosites of the International Association of Geomorphologists (IAG)


P49. Geoparks and geosites: tools for knowledge and protection of geological heritage

Proposers: Pietro Marescotti (Univ. Genova), Rosolino Cirrincione (Univ. Catania)

Geoparks are defined by UNESCO as "single, unified geographical areas where sites and landscapes of international geological significance are managed with a holistic concept of protection, education and sustainable development". Similarly, geoparks and geosites of regional or local interest provide elements to enhance the knowledge of the territory and are important tools for geosciences divulgation as well as for conservation of geological heritage and geodiversity. This session aims to present a wide spectrum of current researches and scientific divulgation experiences performed in geoparks and well-known geosites as well as in areas that are considered important for the protection and enhancement of the geological heritage and which could aspire to apply as recognized sites. It is also planned a roundtable with the delegates of national geoparks for a public discussion on the current challenges and future perspectives in geoparks and geosites management and development. Both the session and the roundtable aim to provide an opportunity for the meeting of scientists and operators carrying out multidisciplinary research and dissemination activities in the various disciplines of Earth Sciences in order to increase networking and cooperation as well as to share resources and ideas for future projects.


P50. History of geosciences and Geoethics: the right way for social responsibility

Proposers: Marco Pantaloni (ISPRA-Roma), Silvia Peppoloni (INGV, Roma), Fabiana Console (ISPRA, Roma), Giuseppe Di Capua (INGV, Roma)

What cultural heritage have we received from the geologists of the past? What value references, insights, ethical guidelines can be recovered? What is the social value of geological knowledge? The history of geosciences is an indispensable starting point for understanding the scientific and cultural climate in which the reference values of the Italian geology matured, the geological thought that accompanied its development and which today, like a red thread, binds us to our past. Geoethics deals with the ethical, social and cultural aspects related to geosciences. One of its objectives is to improve the quality of geological research and practice, enhancing the role of the geologist and emphasizing his/her responsibilities in making decisions that may have repercussions on the natural, social and economic balance of a territory. In recent years the interest in these aspects of the geological activity has grown considerably, also in relation to the increasing urgency of the global challenges that affect our planet (from geological risks to the use of geo-resources, from climate changes to the reduction of pollution) and which require the involvement of geologists, as experts of the territory and its processes. For these reasons, today it is essential to develop a reflection on the cultural and historical identity of the geological sciences, with reference to the knowledge and consciousness of the national territory, its resources and evolution, by deepening the ethical, historical, social and cultural aspects of geosciences, both in practical and theoretical terms, including case studies. The session is jointly organized by the sections of "History of Geosciences" and of "Geoethics and Geological Culture" of the Italian Geological Society, and is promoted by INHIGEO (International Commission on the History of Geological Sciences - www.inhigeo.com) and the IAPG (International Association for Promoting Geoethics - www.geoethics.org).


P51. 1968-2018: Fifty years after the Belice's Earthquake. Considerations on geological, geophysical, geochemical, territorial and social aspects of this earthquake and its heritage in the connections between the Italian society and seismic catastrophes

Proposers: Mario Mattia (INGV, Catania), Paolo Madonia (INGV, Palermo), Giulio Selvaggi (INGV, Roma), Giulia De Spuches (Univ. Palermo), Francesco Martinico (Univ. Catania)

In this session our aim is to follow the dramatic thread that, starting with the Belice earthquake (14-15 January, 1968), crosses the recent history of our Country until the days of the 2016 Amatrice seismic sequence. We interpret the Belice earthquake like the "zero event" for the developing of the connections between the Italian society and the seismic catastrophes striking Italy in the post-war period. First of all, the territory, considered as a unit made up of geographical, geological, social, historical and urban aspects. We invite to submit reflections and stimulating readings for each of these aspects that help to define the geological and structural context in which the Belice earthquake occurred, such as the novelties proposed by the most recent research in geological, geophysical, geochemical and geodetic fields, but also themes and reflections on the impact that the earthquake has had on Italian and Sicilian society, on its housing and infrastructural context, on the history of our country. This session fosters a contamination among different disciplines, reflecting the complexity of the impact that an earthquake has on any territory. We will try to understand why an earthquake occurs in a certain area, how the social context reacts, which effects it produces on different territories and societies. Belice, therefore, but also Friuli, Irpinia, Umbria, Abruzzo, Emilia and Amatrice. A sad paradigm that must be read (and listened to) from various points of view.


P52. The role of abiotic and biotic soil components, environmental materials and factors, and physical evidence in criminal investigations, environmental crimes, and legal system

Proposers: Roberta Somma (Univ. Messina), Eva Sacchi (Animal, Plant and Soil Traces Working Group of European Network Forensic Sciences Institutes - ENFSI), Fabio Tortorici (Fondazione Centro Studi, Consiglio Nazionale dei Geologi), Luca Trombino (Univ. Milano)

Keynote speakers: Luca Ramacci (Magistrato della Suprema Corte di Cassazione)

Meso- and microscale analyses on inorganic, anthropogenic, and organic soil fractions may assist law enforcements and magistrates to solve serious crimes (murder cases, kidnappings, etc.). Analogously, macroscale analyses of the landscape using geoscientific methods may be very useful for the search of clandestine graves related to forced missing people and for solving environmental crimes. Criminal investigations accomplished by forensic scientists on forensic soil evidence and environmental materials and factors may provide critical forensic information to the legal system. This session will offer the opportunity to compare different aspects of investigations to underline the crucial role of the multidisciplinary approach in the soil science.


P53. Soil Science and the Sustainable Development Goals

Proposers: Paola Adamo (Univ. Napoli Federico II), Giuseppe Corti (Univ. Politecnica delle Marche), Edoardo Costantini (CRA-ABP Centro di ricerca per l'agrobiologia e la pedologia, Firenze)

United Nations assigned to soil a key role for development, hydrological cycle and production of sediments, quantity and quality of groundwater, as well as for the landscape protection and biodiversity. The session aims to collect information that illustrate research activities concerning services for Italian natural and agroforestry ecosystems and interventions aimed at maintaining or improving their functionality. The session will also present work on the current state of soil pollution researches and study methodologies and how pollutants can influence functioning in a wide range of contexts and scales. Finally, reconstructions of paleoenvironments and paleoevents will be presented thanks to the discovery of paleosoils, alloctonous substrates and buried soils.


P54. Planetary evolution: insights from geological studies, meteorite analyses and terrestrial analogues

Proposers: Lucia Marinangeli (Univ. G. D'Annunzio, Chieti-Pescara), Valentina Galluzzi (INAF, Roma), Cristian Carli (INAF, Roma)

Planetary geology is an interdisciplinary discipline covering various aspects of the geological sciences in order to reconstruct the overall evolution of a planet. Nowadays, planetary missions are investigating several bodies, and sample return as well as human missions are under development, with an increasing Italian involvement in current and future planetary missions, the contribute of the geological community is fundamental. This session is aimed to bring together scientists from different backgrounds to enhance the discussion on common interests and to have the opportunity to establish synergetic collaboration among different disciplines. Contributes that cover studies from remote sensing analysis, in situ rover and lander data, as well as laboratories activity aimed to study extraterrestrial material are encouraged. Moreover, we also solicit papers on terrestrial site studies as analogues to planetary environments both for scientific and technical purposes including analysis on analogue materials which can contribute to highlight important indicators for planetary analysis.


P55. Geosciences at school 2018: geoscience and society

Proposers: Francesca Cifelli (Univ. Roma Tre), Rosolino Cirrincione (Univ. Catania), Eleonora Paris (Univ. Camerino), Manuela Pelfini (Univ. Milano), Angela Tosto (ANIS)

Nowadays a key point in geoscience education is represented by the relationship between Geoscience and society. In a country like Italy, where the geological hazards are widespread, putting at risk the territory and often the population, a better knowledge of Geosciences is becoming everyday more important. The sustainable use of the georesources and the protection from pollution and climate change effects are world-wide issues to approach. The Italian cultural heritage, which includes the geo-heritage, is also at risk: a better knowledge of the geological-geomorphological processes is important for conservation. A modern and engaging approach towards Geosciences in school can help students to acquire the environmental awareness necessary to become well-informed and responsible future citizens. The aim of this session is therefore to build contacts between teachers and researchers to develop collaborations and synergies on the themes of Geoscience education in relation with the modern society. Following similar sessions organized in the last years during the Geoscience meetings, we invite teachers and researchers to present their projects and didactic experiences focusing in particular on geoscience in the everyday life as well as analysis of the impact of school reforms on geo-education. Poster are welcome and practical activities can be presented in the exhibit "Le mani nella Terra".


P56. Open Poster Session

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